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thecollectibles:Art by Eugene Korolev

Matthew Grabelsky A native New Yorker, I graduated from Rice...



















Matthew Grabelsky

A native New Yorker, I graduated from Rice University in 2002 with a BA in Art and Art History and a BS in Astrophysics. Afterwards, I moved to Florence, Italy, where I spent four years studying thetechniques of classical drawing and painting. Science taught me how to observe the world, and art has allowed me to express my relationship to it.

Since 2006, I have focused on creating paintings that combine the physical world that people see every day with imagery from mythology and dreams.

My work is not intended to be viewed as fantasy or as allegory, but rather as a blend of every-day experiences and the subconscious.

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My paintings are enigmatic, and they create dream-like worlds that invite viewers to form their own interpretations of the imagery presented.

I paint in a highly realistic manner, derived from my studies of 19th-century French Academic painters, and I use this visual language to craft modern narratives. I place my subjects in urban settings: trains, gritty alleyways, and cosmopolitan cityscapes; then introduce a twist to create a mix of rational and irrational elements.

My work is often humorous, and it straddles the divide between the serious and the bizarre. via Saatchi Art

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