Wednesday, January 17, 2018 Wednesday, January 17, 2018

crossconnectmag: Hypnotic Gif Animation from  Erik... crss

















crossconnectmag:

Hypnotic Gif Animation from  Erik Söderberg

Cross-media artist working with visual and auditory design.
I’m specialized in creating and editing images for print and web.
Most of my commercial work is related to retouch, 3D and graphics.


Visit and like  our Facebook      Posted by Andrew

crss

crossconnectmag: Hypnotic Gif Animation from  Erik...

















crossconnectmag:

Hypnotic Gif Animation from  Erik Söderberg

Cross-media artist working with visual and auditory design.
I’m specialized in creating and editing images for print and web.
Most of my commercial work is related to retouch, 3D and graphics.


Visit and like  our Facebook      Posted by Andrew

What Will You Remember Your Mother For?

You don’t have to say you love me by Sherman Alexie is a hard hitting, deep and authentic book which is not only full of true life stories of the author but also a slew of poems that provide a deep outlook on life, situations when dealing with abuse, wit and a lot more. It’s an amazing book that allows anyone to put their life into perspective.

People who are familiar along with his novels will have fun with the authentic-life stories at the back of a number of his fiction; people who aren’t will locate that his writing offers an effective opportunity to the inventory figures of the mythological Wild West – the brave cowboy and the stoic, noble Indian. In the middle of the book, although, is his courting with his mother, a hard, abusive girl who ought to perform acts of large maternal sacrifice on behalf of her youngsters on the same time as treating them shockingly badly.

A love hate relationship

Alexie’s recounting of his mom’s dying differs from preferred grief memoirs, maximum of which are accounts of love or at the least circulate closer to reconciliation. He is indignant at his mother, even after her loss of life and in spite of his efforts to forgive. However, even though he involves comprehend that the motives for her rages had been understandable and even though he is now a parent himself, Alexie nonetheless resents the effect her rage had on him and his siblings.

Whilst his mother passed away on the age of seventy eight, Sherman Alexie answered the simplest way he knew how: he wrote. The end result is this beautiful memoir. Featuring 78 poems, 78 essays and intimate own family pictures, Alexie shares uncooked, indignant, humorous, profane, tender reminiscences of an early life few can imagine–growing up dirt-terrible on an Indian reservation, one in every of 4 kids raised through alcoholic parents. All through, a portrait emerges of his mother as a lovely, mercurial, abusive, shrewd, complex lady.You don’t have to say you love me by Sherman Alexie is a powerful account of a complex dating, an unflinching and unforgettable remembrance.

Reading duration: 9 hours 35 minutes

An amazing book that is not only witty, profane but Sherman’s ability to write gives a vivid texture to emotion that is amalgamated together with beautiful poetry and real-life relatable stories. Get You don’t have to say you love me  by Sherman Alexie from Amazon at $17.72

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Let Your Smart Home Products Become Smarter and Safer With This Product

Advancement in technology has helped to infuse the internet into the electrical appliances and gadgets used in our various homes. With our smartphone, we can switch lights on/off, regulate room temperature, and control various happenings in and around the home. However, IoT puts us at risk. These devices can be hacked by external sources. When an IoT invasion occurs, your whole home is put at risk. For this reason, it is important to guide against that from happening.

Secure Your Home Network

Manufactured by Axi.us, Akita is a sophisticated smart home device that will help provide instant privacy for other smart home devices. Akita offers top level protection for your home from any form of IoT invasion or hacking. This is a small device that offers massive protection for your home.

This advanced smart device watchdog makes use of military-grade security protection solutions to protect your home and provides expert assistance services. By connecting Akira to your router or internet source, the device scans the whole network. In the process, any unusually activity can be detected and shut down immediately.

Advanced Way to Protect Your Smart Homes

Furthermore, Akita makes use of advanced techniques such as threat intelligence, machine learning, and behavioral analysis to ensure that your home is well secured. The device works on the IPS security method, expertly analyzing any communication source. While it carries out its work, it does not slow down your internet connection in any way.

In addition, doesn’t make use of deep packet inspection. What the device does is to keep your smart home devices safe from external invasion and does not invade your privacy. Regular security updates and expert assistance are provided to ensure that the device is up-to-date on latest IoT hack techniques.

Get Yours Today!

Do not wait until your privacy is compromised before taking necessary action. Akita is here to provide corporate-level security for every smart home devices in your home. With Akita, you are in the right direction towards preventing any form of IoT hack or invasion in your home.  Get yours today here.

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It's Not Easy, Making An Easy Living Is It?

Each one of us probably has a day-time occupation, perhaps a decent paycheck, a nice car and a family. We also have our morals and reputations to protect, friends to drink with and, presumably, a home to head to every evening. But though we all have unique lifestyles, nobody can truly tell our struggles when the blanket of darkness cover us!

Here, finally, is a film that depicts the unexplained and unexplained realities of life of a young, single and unlearned mother of today. 

Meet Sherry Graham, a young, desperate blonde who works as makeup saleswoman by the day and a sexy, ruthless alcoholic who sleeps with strangers by night. Sherry, the protagonist in Adam Keleman’s movie “Easy Living,” is optimistic a loving man and a venture will soon arrive and hold her hand for a fresh start. Unfortunately, her plans are foiled, and she becomes a hapless victim of circumstance!

I am the architect of my life!

Indeed she is; a nasty and unapologetic boozy whose young daughter, Alice stays at her sister’s place since 10 years ago. She had been making a tenuous living off cosmetics business during the day before retreating to her motel room for a book or steamy anonymous coitus with a stranger from the bar. But as the movie unfolds, you soon get to know the ironic understatement that is the name of this strange little flick!

Sherry (Caroline Dhavernas) is damn charismatic and endlessly fascinating in her high-risk sexual adventure escapades, yet entirely innocent. Naive as she is, the consummate professional, well-dressed, perhaps fashion-savvy, regularly put on outfits that match her wheeler suitcase, fights on with her makeup business. But as ironic as her character to the title “Easy Living” is, she never forgets to feed a poor stray dog outside her room.

Her drama-filled life is even more interesting, especially when the self-denial overcomes blinded belief and her sister issues her an ultimatum. Sherry is endlessly intriguing, whether trying to get a $250,000 loan which she’s promptly denied, or masturbating alone after another romp escapade gone badly. She even attempts to enter into a serious relationship, but her off-kilter partner appears disinterested. And there’s more to her tribulations!

A steely, naive and vulnerable lass

A personality study of someone who somehow can’t put her life together, “Easy Living” thankfully has zero cases of heavy and platitudinous bromides. “Easy Living” isn’t just another ironical film – it portrays a steely, naïve, vulnerable lass, comically. The whole movie is magnetic, though the final section when she’s held hostage does serve as an unfortunate anti-climax for this Adam Keleman debut film. “Easy Living” is 67% on Rotten Tomatoes.

If Comedy, Drama or Mystery and Suspense movies are your favorites, go watch “Easy Living” an 80-minute masterpiece. It is classic and subtle, recently released with this official YouTube trailer offering a little glimpse of it.

To watch Easy Living on iTunes, click here.

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All You Wanted To Know About Sex Workers

Have you ever wondered what really goes on in the life of a sex worker? It can be a common sight on some streets and while some countries legalise prostitution, most find it an unnecessary underground line of work.

But why do some people choose to be a sex worker and how did they get into it? Is it really for the money or are there deeper issues going on?

Here are some personal sharings from sex workers willing to give their story.

Why did you become a prostitute?

“Being a prostitute is amazing, to be quite frank about it. The money is amazing. The money is why I did it, and would do it again. The feeling of power I got, from making several hundred dollars with only an hour of work, was unlike anything I’ve ever felt before. The idea that I can cover my expenses with only a few clients let me relax so much. I could focus on other things, my art, for instance.”

“Let me preface this by saying I grew up in a well-to-do family. I had more opportunity and privilege than most, but the divorce of my parents in my first year of university ultimately drove me to completely check out of society. In the beginning of my crack addiction I always swore to myself and to anyone who brought up the subject that I would never sell sex for money. Unfortunately, I was very naive and uninformed about the progression of addiction and I ended up getting into sex work once I felt desperate to feed my increasing drug habit.”

What’s it like being a prostitute?

“It’s a job..It’s flexible, it’s sometimes funny. You do meet lots of quirky folk. As for the danger of the job, I can honestly say, I’ve been in more dangerous situations due to ‘normal life’ than ‘work’. There are some crank girls, as with all walks of life, but through work I have met some of the most genuine, logical, hilarious, open, warm, and friendly, strong females out there.”

“To be honest I’ve become quite numb from it all. I do it for money and that’s all. I get all kinds of men visiting me who I find repulsive but I just switch off and go through the motions. I barely remember what happened afterwards.”

Do your family, friends or partners know about your line of work?

“There are some very “out” and proud prostitutes, while others have been outed against their will. Lying is both exhausting and something that doesn’t come easily. I gloss over discussions of work with my family and steer conversation ASAP toward my hobbies: volunteering, pop culture consumption, and inquiries about other family members.”

“When it comes to dating, I’ve disclosed to several men that I stripped (and even met some at the clubs), but I never disclosed being an escort to any guy. Not getting really serious with guys is a defence mechanism; I fear domestic violence or retribution like online shaming. On a day to day basis, I’m always fudging my work situation a bit, sometimes in front of people who know the truth.”

Do you worry about how people perceive you?

“I’m not fame-obsessed like most Americans. I don’t care about celebrities and I don’t care to become one. However, now that I’ve worked — not only as a stripper, but as a full-blown hooker — I’m terrified of becoming a successful writer or public figure. I’m worried that a single Tweet or viral blog post could put me under the microscope and do me in.”

How do you find society treats you?

“You’ve noticed what a trendy topic sex trafficking (modern slavery) is, right? It’s really hit the mainstream, but feminists, law enforcement, and federal lawmakers don’t have a damn clue how to actually distinguish voluntary sex workers from exploited trafficking victims. Instead, they’re letting the bad apples make it harder for the rest of us to do things such as bank and avoid housing discrimination.”

What positives come from being a sex worker?

“You might think that because my clients pay for my companionship, I might not enjoy sex with them as much as I would with a romantic partner. But I have met many wonderful, exciting, interesting, passionate people through my work.”

“I have always been pretty confident in my sexuality, but I’d never really seen myself as sexy. Having clients show me the value of my sexiness in quantifiable terms has helped me wipe the dust off the mirror, and realise that I’m one helluva sexy beast. I’ll always know that now, even once I retire.”

It seems sex work is a complicated issue. While many do it for money, personal and emotional problems and drug addiction, some genuinely love the work they do. A different perspective on this taboo line of work?

Featured photo credit: freestocks.org via pexels.com

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Greed Is Something We Should All Strive For

Most of us don’t want to be called “greedy.” Nobody wants to be the person who fills his plate and leaves others hungry or the person who waits for relatives to drop dead so he can get an inheritance. Greed reveals a darker side of human nature.

There are 2 sides to every coin, though. Could there be a positive side to being selfish?

Greed exists for a reason

When someone is uncomfortable with personal security, their anxiety may manifest as greed. This anxiety may stem from trauma or neglect. For example, a person who grows up not having enough to eat may hoard food and overindulge in adulthood.

In addition to anxiety, many greedy people have self-esteem issues. A child who doesn’t get enough attention grows into the adult that must be in the limelight. People who are insecure about their purpose in life sometimes tie their self-worth to having an abundance of items. Stuff is no substitute for being loved, but the person may feel a temporary sense of comfort from material possessions.[1]

With all the negativity in the news, people feel threatened more than ever. You may have noticed an uptick in greedy behaviors as we all grapple with uncertain times.

We can understand why someone behaves this way, but it doesn’t make us like greedy people more. Even if you know why your friend always takes too many slices of pizza, you’ll still be hungry.

Taking too much harms others

Taking more than you need might not sound bad, but greed ca be negative for others. Look at what happens when the weather service forecasts a major storm. People panic, and instead of buying what they need, they clear the store shelves. The people who arrive late aren’t able to buy anything because there’s nothing left. Greed may be great for the economy, but it doesn’t do much for the human beings on the losing end.

Broadly speaking, when people fixate on hoarding objects or satisfying a desire for more stuff, they miss out on the richness of life. The person will almost never be satisfied, and after they get what they want, they’ll be on the prowl for the next big thing.

Many people realize they’re being greedy and hide who they are. A person who craves having power may become a politician. To do this, he may have to deceive others and craft a persona that will afford him what he wants. He may say–and even believe–that he wants to help others. He may champion the underdog and speak out against the power-hungry even as he lusts for power himself.

Greed doesn’t have to be terrible

Greed can serve a positive purpose in some contexts. One positive is that it’s a form of motivation. Greed inspires people to push for better social and economic outcomes than they have.

Altruism is a better force for creating positive change, but it takes time to develop it. Greed readily dovetails with consumerism. Our society is built on and supported by greedy behavior, whether or not we like it. The quest for more and better stuff has driven societies to the highest levels of achievement.

Societies that try to function without greed and hierarchy dissolve into chaos. Having a hierarchy naturally causes inequality, but people with more power often take actions that improve our lives.[2]

Over two centuries ago, Adam Smith, economist and philosopher, explained that individuals who acted out of self-interest would be supported by the economy and make society better. The greed behind capitalism may seem unattractive, but the results are often desirable.[3]

We saw examples of this prosperity in the US in the 1980s and 1990s on Wall Street. Productivity was high and unemployment rates were low. The stock market made many investors wealthy.

When the dotcom bubble burst and the value of shares dropped, people realized that greed has its limitations. In 1999, American households had a net worth-to- income ratio of 6.3. It has since fallen to 5.3. Even though we’re still doing better than our long term average, we’ve seen a decrease in quality of life across a large portion of the middle class.

Optimistic investors feel that this is part of the natural ebb and flow of the market, but perhaps this downturn was a warning about going for things well outside of our means.

Can it really be bad for us to recognize our limits and live in accordance with needs instead of wants?

Use greed to your advantage

1. Recognize the root of your greed.

Greed may be a sign that you have some insecurities to work through.

Someone who constantly has to shop may be trying to fill an emotional void or insecurity with stuff. If you find yourself loading your shopping bags every week, think about why you’re doing it. You may even need to seek professional help to deal with these issues.

2. Use greed to drive change.

Greed motivates you to climb the socio-economic ladder.

The unhappy person can change their life. If you’re unsatisfied with your quality of life, your desire to accumulate things could be a sign to get a better job or capitalize on an idea.

3. Sharing is caring.

If your desire for more things ends up making you wealthy and successful, use your power to look out for others.

When you’re top dog, you have a great opportunity to give back. Look at the philanthropic work people such as Bill Gates and Oprah Winfrey do because they have the means.

Following these steps gives you a chance to reflect on yourself and affords you a opportunity to make the world better.

Flip the notion of greed on its head

Most of us possess a basic drive to want things that we don’t have. Instead of viewing this as a negative mindset, see it as an opportunity to improve your life and the lives of others.

Featured photo credit: The Digital Artist via pixabay.com

Reference

[1] Psychology Today: Is greed good?
[2] Time: Greed is Good: Science Proves It
[3] The Economist: Is Greed Good?

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Eating Fast to Save Time Is Shortening Your Life

Brits only spend 41 minutes of their day, total, to eat breakfast, lunch and dinner. To break that down, that means an average eating time of 8 minutes for breakfast, 13 minutes 45 seconds for lunch, and 19 minutes 27 seconds for breakfast.[1]

Americans take just a bit more time, with an average of one hour and 14 minutes a day spent eating the three major meals.[2]

While any one of us could easily justify the need for speed when it comes to eating (after all, there are always so many more things to get done in a day!), people who eat too quickly are likely to become obese, or develop metabolic syndrome, both of which increase your risk of heart disease, diabetes and stroke – all of which can be deadly.[3]

Your Body on Eating Fast

When you rush through a meal, no matter what time of day it is, your digestive system can’t keep up. When that happens, it can’t trigger the little flags in your brain that let you know you’re full. Inevitably, you overeat.

When you’ve ingested something, it takes a while for your stomach to catch up anyway – about 20 minutes, in fact. The process doesn’t start until your stomach begins to stretch. So if you slow down and give yourself a little more time, you may find that if you stop eating sooner, you won’t eat excess foods.

Eating slower gives your stomach more time to start working on the food

Think about the last time you were really hungry. Once you got your hands on food, you probably found yourself capable of eating just about everything in sight, and doing it quickly! You also probably suffered from serious heartburn later on. This is due to your stomach trying to catch up with the pace at which you were sending all that food down.

Eating slower and taking at least 20 minutes to eat at a time, allows your digestive tract to get a head start in the process of digesting the food.

Additionally, when you eat too quickly, air gets into your stomach and overloads it. While this can produce more acid leading to heartburn or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), it can also make you embarrassingly gassy.

Eating at a slower pace can help you enjoy your meal

Granted, you’ll already enjoy your food more if you don’t have heartburn, GERD, gas and bloating, but slowing down when you’re enjoying a meal can help you savor whatever it is you’re eating, as it allows you to be more aware.

You’ll find that you’re more aware of the texture, flavor and smell of the food, making the meal more interesting and memorable. This is especially great if you’re eating at a restaurant and you want to enjoy the moment.

How to Adapt the 20 Minute Eating Rule

If you have a habit of eating a lot, and doing so quickly, you won’t change that overnight. However, there are plenty of tips you can use to improve the time you take to eat a meal and eat as slow as 20 minutes for each meal.

1. Choose high-fiber foods that take more time to chew

What could you eat faster, raw broccoli or a breadstick? The high fiber, fresh veggie will take you longer to eat, simply because of its texture. Plus, the nutrients will fill you up faster! While you’re learning to slow down your eating habits, you’ll also be building some really healthy ones!

2. Put down your utensils between bites

This tip can feel daunting, but it isn’t as bad as you might think. In between bites, set down your utensil. It’s a small move, but the action forces you to slow down, even the smallest amount, and really focus on checking in with your body to determine if you’re full or not yet.

3. Try setting a minimum number of chews per bite

When you aren’t breaking down your food into tiny pieces, it can be very challenging to digest later on. Try to set a minimum number of chews per bite. This can be five or thirty-five, whatever feels best to you. Once you get into the habit, you won’t even have to count anymore.

4. Find another slow eater and pace yourselves to them

If you are aware you eat quickly, it’s probably because someone you dine with has pointed it out to you. The next time you eat with them, focus on the pace in which they consume their meal and match up to them. You don’t have to mirror them to the point they are uncomfortable, just find some self-awareness.

5. Talk with people who eat with you and slow down your eating pace

Be sociable. When you’re dining with someone, carry on a conversation. You’ll be amazed at how much less you need to eat to feel full.

Slow and Steady Wins

As you approach your next meal, and every meal thereafter, try to treat the experience like a memory to be made. If you go into the experience aware of the need to make it memorable, you may find yourself having an easier time slowing down to eat.

No matter how you have to train yourself to slow down, you’ll be grateful you took the time to do so. No meal and no rushed timeline is worth losing your health.

Featured photo credit: pixabay via pixabay.com

Reference

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How to Make Your Words Powerful Without Sounding Aggressive

The way we use language can help convey context, feelings and emotions. Whether we’re writing or speaking, the words we use have certain ways to put across the ideas and opinions we want to communicate and there are two very distinct types: hard and soft words.

Hard words are short words with fewer letters that deliver a sharp and punchy sound. When we use these types of words, it’s to reflect an element of firmness and decisiveness and a way of getting a point across. Examples of hard words are: simple, correct, hard, accept, or at the same time.

On the other hand, soft words tend to contain more letters and syllables that convey a more gentle sound and reflecting a sense of softness and sophistication. Examples of soft words are: difficult, incomplex, legitimate, acknowledge or simultaneously.

Hard words come from Old English or the Anglo-Saxon heritage. During these times, the English language contained a plethora of functional words such as prepositions and conjunctions, many of which contained short, sharp words of one syllable.

However, after the invasion of England by France in 1066, these Anglo-Saxon stark words become much more softened due to the French language influence. Since the language of the court, government and the upper class was heavily impacted by Norman French, the traditional Old English was infiltrated by the softer and more descriptive words we use today. As time went on, more influence on the English language came from Latin and Greek resulting in the language evolving into a more softened vocabulary and less complex grammar.

Hard words vs Soft Words

There are advantages and disadvantages to the types of words we use, no matter which type.

Hard Words Are Sharp but Blunt

The pros of using hard words are that they’re short, sharp and concise, meaning they submit a punch which is useful for getting important impacting messages across.

However, the con of using hard words is that they tend to sound rigid and emotionless often depicting a harsh command. When it comes to teaching children, parents are more likely to use hard words to show intention of unacceptable behaviour because these are the easiest words for kids to understand and therefore getting them to correct their unwanted behaviour. But the rigidness of these words can encourage children to continue bad behaviour because of the negative feelings conveyed through the use of these types of words.

Soft Words Are Gentle but Vague

Soft words are able to soften hard statements which has the ability to allow people to be more likely to accept and understand them. But the downside to soft words is that they can come across as lengthy and distracting which can make it difficult for others to get the main point of what you’re trying to convey. This ultimately can lessen that punch you need for getting important messages across.

Governments, authorities and big organizations often use soft words in public announcements or press conferences because the use of soft words helps reduce complaints from the public. Soft words are a way of sounding gentle, sophisticated and responsible without offending the general consensus. However, these words can end up being abstract and empty – in other words, they sound good but don’t help to directly address particular problems.

When Words Are Put in the Wrong Place

So what if we were to switch the situations where hard and soft words are used?

If parents were to only use soft words when disciplining their children, the chances are they would still become uncontrollable because they’re too young to behave without rules and use of a stricter tone and language.

Also, if governments and authorities were to only use hard words when dealing with public interactions, yes they’d be getting the facts across clearly but they would pay a price in terms of their audience not accepting harsh truths or offending certain groups within communities.

Hard and Soft Words Together Are The Best Combination

The optimum form of communication and to get your point or message across effectively, is to use both types of words depending on the evolving receptiveness of what you’re saying.

The most effective formula is to generally use more hard words than soft. This helps take the edge off any harsh connotations together with avoiding abstract language which can distract and defer from your main points.

When you need to deliver that punchy message or you need the information to be concise and direct, hard words are your best option. But if you find your message is too blunt, is moving into the direction of negative receptivity or isn’t being understood fully by your audience, it’s time to include softer words.

One of the most successful people of our generation was Steve Jobs. Not only was he a pioneer in transforming his field, he knew how to effectively communicate to an audience using both hard and soft words.

In his speech, Jobs demonstrates his genius use of short but punchy words to tell his story yet interjects a range of softer words to allow an easier and more understanding pace for the audience.

So, use the concept of hard and soft words in your everyday life. Be more mindful and aware of the types of words you use and how effective they are being in getting your point across to others.

A great tool is to write down the most common words you’re using and identify how hard or soft they are. You can then use this to evaluate and change your hard and soft word combinations to become a better communicator and see how people start responding in a more receptive manner.

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What You Need To Know About Being More Creative In the Absence of Judgment

Do you believe that you are an innovator or creator? Creative people get their originality from their productive capacity and are not good at knowing whether their creations are a hit or miss. This means that what makes them great is their volume of original creations rather than their talent.

However, this is easier said than done. It takes a lot of input to maximize your quantity and maintain the quality of your work. This read aims at helping you increase your creativity without judging yourself as you do it.

Improve the Creation Process

The first step involves figuring out exactly what you aim at creating. Make sure that you have a clear direction before you embark on any plans. This entails figuring out what you intend to achieve within the next month or year. As you create, stop focusing on perfection.

Perfection leads to judgment, which kills creativity. Give your creativity a chance to flourish in the market. If you make a wrong decision, then move forward instead of comparing your work to others and beating yourself up.

As you begin, find your flow and use it to boost our creative efficiency. This flow will bring about enjoyment, involvement, and an energized feeling that will help you improve your creations. At this point, the mind is at its maximum potential and it creates a good environment for accomplishing success.

Sustain the Development Process

This involves working on your consistency. Successful people have a clear goal outline and a consistent nature that helps them achieve them. They plan their routines to facilitate their goals and visions.

What time of the day works best for your creativity? Some people are more productive during the day, while others thrive during the night. Use this to your advantage, by freeing up your schedule and concentrating on your invention(s).

Find out what works for you and include it in your daily routine. Maintain this consistency throughout the creation period. This will help you develop a habit that will help you focus on your flow and increase the number of your creations.

Inculcate Consistency and Deliberation into Your Routine

Make the daily choice to invest in your ideas and creativity deliberately. Discipline yourself by working hard and setting aside the time to make your ideas a reality. Make a habit out of it and transform it into a natural routine. In addition to this, make a point of transforming your mindset by believing in yourself more. J

udgment comes from an inner disapproval that creators face. If you feel a constant need of comparing your work to others or of not sharing your ideas with the public out of fear, then you need to work on uplifting your mindset. This will make the beginning and sustenance of the creation process easier.

The aforementioned general outlook will aid you in increasing your creativity and reducing your judgmental nature. To read the full article, click here.

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Boost Your Speed of Thought With This Technique

Are you looking for a way to increase your speed of thought? If so, you should start using metaphors and analogies. They are powerful tools that drive and steer the way we think and act.[1]

The use of metaphors and analogies assist us in connecting the dots. Jane Hirshfield describes them as a way to feel and know something differently. She says that they are a way to talk about one thing by describing something else.[2] Essentially, they give words a way to go far beyond their meaning.

Let’s take a look at how metaphors and analogies create the handles to open doors to new understanding.

Cognitive Jigs: Simile, Metaphor, and Analogy

In Systems Thinking Made Simple: New Hope for Solving Wicked Problems, Derek and Laura Cabrera describe cognitive jigs as common underlying structures of systemic thought which can be used over and over again to create meaning and understanding.

Cognitive jigs save us cognitive effort and increase our speed of thought.

Let’s take a brief look at the three types of cognitive jigs: simile, metaphor, and analogy.

Simile

The Cabrera’s explain the difference between three specific cognitive jigs in a series of videos found at the Cabrera Research Lab.

So, what is a simile? I built a diagram to further my understanding of a simile (using the videos via the Cabrera Research Lab). Let’s take a look.

Metaphor

The “conduit metaphor” explained by Michael Reddy is a great example of how a metaphorical concept can hide an aspect of our experience.[3]

Reddy explains how our language about language is structured by this complex metaphor. Let’s take a look at the parts of the “conduit metaphor” then the metaphor itself.

  • Ideas (or meanings) are objects.
  • Linguistic expressions are containers.
  • Communication is sending.

Reddy explains this metaphor in more detail,

“The speaker puts ideas (objects) into words (containers) and sends them (along a conduit) to a hearer who takes the idea/objects out of the word/containers.”

Analogy

The Cabrera’s discussion of analogies as cognitive jigs provide us a remarkable way to view what they call – analogy-technology. They explain that,

“The genius behind the invention of analogies was that they gave us a mental model of a common way we understand things by comparison to a known thing.”

Furthermore, they provide a simplistic (yet extremely helpful) view of the structure of an analogy: A is to B as/like C is to D.

Let’s take a look at a few examples of innovative metaphors and analogies.

Brain Internet Metaphor

A great resource for using, sharing, and understanding analogies and metaphors was developed as a Wikiversity Learning Project by the Global Education for Sustainable Development found at GlobalESD.org.

They offer a list of example analogies and metaphors. Let’s take a look at one: Brain Internet Metaphor. As a society, we typically look to the latest technological advancement to compare the brain to. It’s popular to compare the brain to a computer; however, comparing it to the Internet seems to be more appropriate.[4]

In this metaphor, we are referring to the Internet and not the World Wide Web. The Web is merely an application used on the Internet. The Internet, like the brain, is a network of interconnected links.[5]

In essence, we can learn more about the brain by comparing it to the vast number of interconnected links within the Internet.

Biomimicry

In her book Biomimicry, Janine Benyus defines Biomimicry as imitating or taking inspiration from nature’s forms and processes to solve problems for humans. Biomimicry is a phenomenal field, one that has the potential to completely reshape our entire reality.

The team at GlobalESD.org identifies the following: Biomimicry is adapting the designs of nature to solve the design challenges facing humans. Furthermore, they discuss how we can think of it as a way to develop and refine analogies between nature and society.

Benyus demonstrates this by way of analogy. She argues that we should run our businesses like a redwood forest. She says that a mature forest is a fully self-sustaining producer of diversity and abundance. Instead, we seem to run our businesses similar to invasive weeds.

Center of Gravity

Famous military strategist Carl von Clausewitz introduced a physics analogy into warfare in his magnum opus On War. He wrote,

“Just as (in physics) the center of gravity is always found where the mass is most concentrated, and just as every blow directed against the body’s center of gravity yields the greatest effect, and – moreover – the strongest blow is the one achieved by the center of gravity, the same is true in war.”

The center of gravity in physics is the point where the forces of gravity converge within an object – the spot for which an objects weight is balanced in all directions.[6] For the most part, military strategists have taken this analogy literally. Right or wrong, it does offer some merit.

I recently came across an article on this topic from the Naval War College Review. In the article, Lieutenant Colonel Antulio J. Echevarria provides a deep look into the center of gravity analogy. He presented what was, to me, an extremely interesting discussion on where the center of gravity of a boomerang is located. Regarding a boomerang, the center of gravity does not lie on the actual object, but in the V-shaped space between a person’s arms.

My question is, if taken literally, is this a more appropriate example of a center of gravity in warfare? Meaning, could the center of gravity be unseen and not visible (i.e. ideology or culture)? This question demonstrates the profound impact an analogy can have on just about anything.

Finally, in her TEDEd video The Art of the Metaphor, Jane Hirshfield describes how metaphors give words a way to go beyond their own meaning. She ends her video with a deep and profound metaphor,

“Metaphors are handles on the door of what we can know, and what we can imagine. Each door leads to some new house, and some new world that only that one handle can open. What’s amazing is this: by making a handle, you can make a world.”

Featured photo credit: pixabay via pixabay.com

Reference

[1] Analogies for Sustainable Development: Wikiversity
[2] Jane Hirshfield: The art of the metaphor
[3] George Lakoff and Mark Johnson: Metaphors we live by
[4] Baronchelli, Ferrer-i-Cancho, Pastor-Satorras, Chater, and Chrisiansen: Networks in Cognitive Science
[5] Chris Woodford: The Internet and the Brain
[6] Echevarria: Clausewitz’s Center of Gravity. It’s not what we thought

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crossconnectmag:

The Gray Man by Cayetano Ferrandez

Cayetano Ferrandez is a Spanish artist and photographer. In his ingeniously photographed art installation called ‘El Hombre Gris’ (The Gray Man) Cayetano uses toy dolls to build stories on stereotypes of gender rooted in the collective imagination. via 


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posted by Margaret

crossconnectmag: The Gray Man by Cayetano Ferrandez Cayetano... crss



















crossconnectmag:

The Gray Man by Cayetano Ferrandez

Cayetano Ferrandez is a Spanish artist and photographer. In his ingeniously photographed art installation called ‘El Hombre Gris’ (The Gray Man) Cayetano uses toy dolls to build stories on stereotypes of gender rooted in the collective imagination. via 


You need the art in order to love the life. We guarantee you that!

posted by Margaret

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