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What to Do When You Work for a Micromanaging Boss

It’s not a pleasant feeling when your boss is breathing down your neck, giving you the impression that they don’t fully trust you. Working under a micromanaging boss can be a true nightmare sometimes. From the moment you step into the office, you can feel their need to be in control of everything. They give you detailed explanations on everything you should do, believing they are the only ones who know how to do a certain task properly. They will check on your progress several times a day. They will remind you frequently of what you need to do, even though you are well aware of your responsibilities.

Is Your Boss a Control Freak? Probably Not in Most Cases…

The most important thing you need to understand is that their need to control comes from their own anxiety, and it doesn’t mean your performance is not good. Just try to imagine for a second how it would be in their shoes – they have an overwhelming amount of responsibilities, and they are accountable for a large group of people. The more people working under them, the less control they have thus they are trying to assert control in any possible way.

But If You Don’t Change the Situation, Your Progress Will Be Hampered

By trying to create such a controlling environment, your boss at the same time creates an environment that is demoralizing you and inhibiting your progress. You don’t have room to be creative or try to do things differently. As your every step is carefully monitored and planned in advance, you cannot gain new valuable experiences and grow professionally.

Yes, it can be exhausting, but you can continue being under their thumb, or try to make some changes that will make your job easier.

Here’s How You Can Enough Space for Growth Without Changing Your Boss’ Leadership Style

Predict your boss’s moves

After a while, you will be well familiar with your boss’s daily requirements, so do certain tasks even before they ask you to. For example, send the updates on your progress regularly without your boss having to ask for them. It is easier for you to do it forehand than to be constantly interrupted and annoyed with your boss’s requests. That way, you are eliminating their need to be in control – you are telling you can do something without constant reminders, and your boss will finally figure out they don’t need to tell you the same thing 10 times a day.

Try putting yourself into their shoes

Your boss definitely has a lot of things on their mind. Even though their behavior is difficult to put with, from time to time, just try to imagine what they feel like and the amount of pressure they have to deal with. Try showing them you can relate to what they are going through and that you are doing everything you can to make their job easier.

Show them they can trust you

Trying to confront your boss about their excessive control might be counterproductive, as micromanaging bosses tend to think they are doing everything perfectly. What would be productive is to show them you are organized and pay attention to details. Ask them to give you a task that you will do single-handedly, without their interference. If you do it successfully, they will understand that you don’t need constant supervision, and that you are more productive when given more independence.

What are my responsibilities?

To avoid constant interruptions, talk with your boss and have them list what your everyday responsibilities are, such as writing progress reports, organizing files, being responsible for other employees or taking care that everything happens on time. Commit to doing those tasks regularly without being reminded, and your boss will interrupt you less.

Ask detailed questions

Upon being given a certain project or task, make sure you get all the details. That will show your boss you are detail-oriented and that you know your responsibilities and boundaries. Make sure you ask about the deadline, what’s the priority of the project compared to your other responsibilities, what you must do, and what should be avoided. You will show your boss you understand their specific concerns and that you are prepared to address all the possible issues.

Micromanaging bosses are a handful, but there are many ways you can deal with them. However, if your relationship doesn’t improve and you keep feeling nervous and unmotivated, you might consider changing your workplace.

The post What to Do When You Work for a Micromanaging Boss appeared first on Lifehack.



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