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How To Save 21 Days Per Year By Typing Fast

Did you know that typing fast could save you up to 21 days per year?[1] This might sound unbelievable, but it is totally possible.

The average person spends at least three hours a day using a keyboard while doing work, writing emails, messaging, using social networks, etc.

If you increase your typing speed by 20%, you can save up to 35 minutes per day. That equals a phenomenal 213 hours per year. Considering that most people have about 10 hours of active time per day, you could be saving up to 21 days each year!

Nowadays, we spend so much time typing on a keyboard that typing seems nothing special today; so much so that we seldom give any thought to this survival skill, let alone try to improve our typing speed.

However, bringing you typing speed from the average 41 words per minute (wpm) to 70wpm or above could actually make a difference.

Slow typers are commonly seen as less capable.

A large part of our day is spent typing. Indeed, not having the right technique can cause more trouble than looking awkward in front of friends or co-workers. For instance, a slow typist may be considered less capable and therefore less suitable for a certain job.[2]

Although almost everyone can type, typing fast is a valuable skill.

Now you might be wondering how to improve your typing speed. Here is some good news:

To type faster, professional and expensive training is not necessary.

A Finnish research found that people who had not received training in typing, e.g. those who typed with only 2 fingers, could also achieve higher typing speeds of over 70wpm, although trained typists could reach 120wpm.[3]

Which is to say, you can also type fast — you just need practice, and practice it correctly.

The main factor influencing speed is the stillness of the palm, not the number of fingers used.

Researcher Dr Weir from Aalto University in Helsinki suggests that keeping your palm still while moving only your fingers to reach out for the keys is “the secret”.[4]

Keeping your hands relatively steady and only using your fingers to move forward for the keys is the secret, so another finger is reaching for the next key, even before the first one is pressed.

This helps maintain a consistent fingering pattern, allowing you to type fast.

Now you know the secret of typing fast, what’s next?

Measure how fast you can type and set a goal for yourself.

The first step is to measure how fast you can type currently so you know where you are now and can keep track of your progress as you learn typing faster.[5].This should help you set your goal for improvement, and track your progress as you type faster.

You can do that via a quick speed test here.

Typing could be fun, you don’t have to always take the serious courses.

While there are plenty of free online typing courses, you can make practice fun for yourself by playing typing games online. Here are a few suggestions:

Remember, typing fast does make a difference — it’s 21 days that you can save!

Featured photo credit: Stocksnap via stocksnap.io

Reference

[1] Ratatype: Typing speed research: how to save 21 days per year while typing
[2] John D Cook: How much does typing speed matter?
[3] The Guardian: Is touch-typing no quicker than doing it with two fingers?
[4] The Guardian: Is touch-typing no quicker than doing it with two fingers?
[5] Life Optimizer: Save Time by Improving Your Typing Speed

The post How To Save 21 Days Per Year By Typing Fast appeared first on Lifehack.



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