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crossconnectmag: Bahadir Baruter  x-ist hosts Bahadır Baruter’s...





















crossconnectmag:

Bahadir Baruter

 x-ist hosts Bahadır Baruter’s new solo show Home Sweet Home  Questioning societal taboos through intimate portraits, Baruter brings to light hidden realities of the concepts of home and marriage through a fictional narrative.
As a continuation of his previous show, Your Family is a Lie, Dear, Baruter this time delves into the inner worlds of women who are raised with the goals of marriage and raising a family. Peeling off the masks that people put on in order to disguise their true feelings inside a household, Bahadır invites the audience for an introspective look through characters that stare the viewer in the eye. The women in his stories yearn for the release of their true spirit after realizing the difference between what their dreams offered them and what they are actually experiencing. Now these civilized characters of Baruter desire more than ever a life in touch with their true selves and nature.

We witness an inner inquiry of individuals who feel lonely and insecure at times and captive at others, as a result making semi-voluntary life decisions under the influence of societal structures and rules. Home Sweet Home

Bahadır Baruter (born 1963) is Turkish caricaturist and one of the founders of the L-manyak, Penguen, Lombak cartoon magazines. He is husband of writer Mine Söğüt.

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Thanks to Lustik

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