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thecollectibles:Art by Eugene Korolev

Unusual horse colors

The Cremello Akhal-Teke


This Ahkal-Teke horse makes the rounds on /r/pics periodically, so I thought I'd show you guys some of the other awesome colors horses can come in. This is cremello, a creme color base with blue eyes, but not albino or white. This is a result of the creme dilution gene, which has several variations.



Dappled Grey


Grey is an unnatural color in horses that is a result of artificially selected breeding. All grey horses will eventually fade to white, including the one pictured here. What differentiates a white-grey from a true white horse is all greys have black skin. A true white horse has pink skin.



Pinto




Pinto is the combination of white and another solid color. The combinations very greatly. This is a black/white pinto.



Buckskin Pinto


Dappled grey pinto


Blue roan


Black base with silver/blue.



Red roan


Bay Brindle


Grey brindle


Chocolate Flaxen


Classic Champagne


Champagne is a dilution gene, similar to creme. Classic champagne is black base diluted by the champagne.

Gold Champagne


Chestnut base diluted by champagne gene.



Perlino


A creme gene variation. Perlinos have a more reddish color, especially in the mane and tail.



Buckskin


Grullo


A buckskin variation.



Leopard spots


Commonly associated with Appaloosa horses, there are a couple breeds that are spotted, including the Danish Knabstrupper.



Mosaic


A combo of two solid base colors, this is very uncommon.



Red rabaicano


Sabino


Silver buckskin


Sooty on chestnut


There are many more color variations, but this is a good subset.




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