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thecollectibles:Art by Eugene Korolev

Postcard House by Hufft Projects

Hufft Projects have designed the Postcard House near Table Rock Lake in Missouri.


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Description from the architect



The house was commissioned by two brothers as a weekend retreat located on Table Rock Lake in southwest Missouri. It is situated on a peninsula with lake views on three sides. The house sits on columns and utilizes pervious paving. Natural light and ventilation flow strategically through the home enhancing it’s picturesque views and relation to the natural setting. Design decisions regarding form and material choices respect and develop these ideals. Taking inspiration from a vintage Polaroid Camera, the form of the building is intended to frame the scenic setting from every angle – creating ‘postcards’ from within. This house is all about the experience and the views.


The Postcard House is a conventional wood frame construction. Exterior materials consist of prefinished metal panels, and stained cedar siding. The building envelope features spray-foam insulation and thermally improved glazing for superior energy efficiency. High-efficiency forced-air systems heat and cool the house.



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Design: Hufft Projects


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