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thecollectibles:Art by Eugene Korolev

Tangible Light – RIMA Lamp Allows You to Interact with Your Desk Lamp

Rima Lamp features minimalist and clean lines, slender shapes with exquisite materials. It’s a desk lamp that combines smart design and state-of-the art technology, inspired by the idea of tangible interaction. This concept lamp provides you with individual and flexible lighting, there’s no need for conventional on-off switch. You can adjust the position and dimension of the illuminated areas by moving 4 rings stringed to the 90cm long fixtures in horizontal direction.


To turn the LEDs on or off, simply move the ring, it’s as easy as drawing a curtain. This newly developed technology is based on LEDs connected in series which are controlled by a processor. There are optical sensors that detect the position of each ring, the smart processor will limit the power supply to the LEDs located between the 2 rings, in this way, only those LEDs are switched on.


Designer : Matthias Pinkert


Tangible Light - Rima Lamp by Matthias Pinkert


Tangible Light - Rima Lamp by Matthias Pinkert



You can gradually switch on the entire light by sliding the first ring to the right. When you adjust the second ring, slide it to the right as well, LEDs positioned behind that ring will be switched off. You can continue with the third ring with the same principle. Switching off can be done simply by moving those rings back to their starting position.


Another cool functionality allows you to adjust the light color and intensity as well as direction by rotating the second ring which mounted to basic ring. Rima Lamp uses energy-saving LED technology, therefore, its energy consumption doesn’t exceed 10 watts even when all LEDs are on.


Tangible Light - Rima Lamp by Matthias Pinkert


Tangible Light - Rima Lamp by Matthias Pinkert


Tangible Light - Rima Lamp by Matthias Pinkert


Tangible Light - Rima Lamp by Matthias Pinkert


Tangible Light - Rima Lamp by Matthias Pinkert


Tangible Light - Rima Lamp by Matthias Pinkert


Tangible Light - Rima Lamp by Matthias Pinkert


Tangible Light - Rima Lamp by Matthias Pinkert


Tangible Light - Rima Lamp by Matthias Pinkert


Tuvie has received “Rima Lamp” from our ‘Submit A Design‘ feature, where we welcome our readers to submit their design/concept for publication.





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Tangible Light – RIMA Lamp Allows You to Interact with Your Desk Lamp is originally posted on Tuvie


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