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thecollectibles:Art by Eugene Korolev

Student Flat by Tengbom Architects

Tengbom Architects have designed a 10 square meter student living unit that is currently being exhibited at the Virserum Art Museum in Småland, Sweden.


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From the architects



Tengbom Architects has designed a student flat for students which is affordable, environmental-friendly and smart both in terms of design and choice of materials. The project is a collaboration with wood manufacturer Martinsons and real estate company AF Bostäder.


To meet the needs of students in a sustainable, smart and affordable way was the key questions when Tengbom in collaboration with students at the University of Lund was designing this student flat of 10 square meters. The unit is now displayed in Virserum Art Museum. In 2014, 22 units will be built and ready for students to move into.


To successfully build affordable student housing requires innovative thinking and new solutions. The area in each unit is reduced from current requirement, 25 square meters to 10 square meters through legal consent. This truly compact-living flat still offers a comfortable sleeping-loft, kitchen, bathroom and a small garden with a patio. Through an efficient layout and the use of cross laminated wood as a construction material the rent is reduced by 50 % and the ecological impact and carbon footprints is also significantly reduced.


Energy efficiency is a key issue when designing new buildings. Choosing right material and manufacturing methods is vital to minimize the carbon emission and therefore wood was chosen for its carbon positive qualities, and as a renewable resource it can be sourced locally to minimize transportation. The manufacturer method was chosen because of is flexible production and for it’s assembling technique which can be done on site to reduce construction time.


By exhibiting this well planned and sustainable student flat we want to challenge the conventional views and show new ways of thinking. What is “good” living? What materials can we use? To meet the future in a sustainable way we must be innovative in all aspects and have the courage to break new ground, says Linda Camara at Tengbom Architects.


The exhibit is open to the public until the 8th of December.



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Architect: Linda Camara & Pontus Åqvist, Tengbom

Assistant Architect: Lina Rengstedt, Olof Nordenson, Magnus Juhlin

Photography: Bertil Hertzberg


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