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thecollectibles:Art by Eugene Korolev

Ariel Cruiser by Vasilatos Ianis Has Won Local Motors Cruiser Design Challenge

Love…love…love… those 3 words express how much I love this vintage motorcycle design from Vasilatos Ianis, Ariel Cruiser. It was a design submission for Local Motors Cruiser Design Challenge, it’s not surprising that this concept won the first place in the competition out of 90 entries from 17 different countries. One of Vasilatos dreams is to design a motorized bike that reminds us of the good ol’ days of early 1900s. Every parts of this bike has been designed to reflect the history of boardtrack racing and motorbikes, starting from the motor and engine cover, fuel tank, to leather straps that keep the tank in its place. Awesome.


Designer : Vasilatos Ianis


Ariel Cruiser by Vasilatos Ianis Has Won Local Motors Cruiser Design Challenge


Ariel Cruiser by Vasilatos Ianis Has Won Local Motors Cruiser Design Challenge



Ariel Cruiser by Vasilatos Ianis Has Won Local Motors Cruiser Design Challenge


Ariel Cruiser by Vasilatos Ianis Has Won Local Motors Cruiser Design Challenge


Ariel Cruiser by Vasilatos Ianis Has Won Local Motors Cruiser Design Challenge


Ariel Cruiser by Vasilatos Ianis Has Won Local Motors Cruiser Design Challenge


Ariel Cruiser by Vasilatos Ianis Has Won Local Motors Cruiser Design Challenge is originally posted on Tuvie


Comments

  1. We loved riding along the bike path through Santa Monica and Venice and she taught us a lot of history about the Venice canals. wellington electric bikes

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