Skip to main content

thecollectibles:Art by Eugene Korolev

3D printed Exoskeleton shoes ain’t meant for walking!

 Prasad:

3D printing may not be at the level where it can print out food or readymade good just yet but that isn't stopping pioneers from experimenting in that direction. Created by Janina Alleyne, UK-based fashion footwear designer, the collection of shoes, including pairs called The Exoskeleton, The Reptile and The Scorpion, are all printed out via a 3D printer and the crafty high heels promise to usher in an era of customized shoes with their advent.

3D printed shoes by Janina Alleyne
3D printed shoes by Janina Alleyne

Using 3D modeler Inner Leaf, three very unusual sets of shoes were printed out by the designer in separate pieces which were later joined and finished by hand. With a set of sinister teeth-like finish at the end, texturing that makes the shoes look like bones and very pointy edges, the shoes look like a cross between an ivory antique and an alien artifact.

3D printed shoes- The Exoskeleton
3D printed shoes- The Exoskeleton

The strappy shoes are offered in platform wedge heels and a scarily delicate pump-style heel with gladiator-straps closure, a zip up back closure as well as an open ankle style that is oh so very much in vogue at the moment.

3D printed shoes- The Reptile
3D printed shoes- The Reptile

Alleyne has not shared pictures of the shoes being worn around by models but we fully expect the innovative pairs to be patronized by Britain's latest style icon the Duchess of Cambridge, her equally fashionable sister Pippa and by at-least by the likes of Lady Gaga and Katy Perry whenever they hit the stores.

3D printed shoes- The Scorpion
3D printed shoes- The Scorpion

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Photos Are Always Funnier When You Add a Caption (31 pics)

Stiff Pose Victorian Postmortem photography (140 Pics)

Postmortem photography or memento mori, the photographing of a deceased person, was a common practice in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The photographs were considered a keepsake to remember the dead. Child mortality was high during the Victorian era. For many children even a common sickness could be fatal. When a child or other family member died, families would often have a photograph taken before burial. Many times it was the first and last photograph they would ever possess of their loved one. Many postmortem photographs were close-ups of the face or shots of the full body. The deceased were usually depicted to appear as if they were in a deep sleep, or else arranged to appear more life-like. Children were often shown on a couch or in a crib, often posed with a favorite toy. It was not uncommon to photograph very young children with a family member, most frequently the mother. Adults were more commonly posed in chairs or even propped up on something.

Brilliant Stairs photos